BMW 335i First Drive

San Francisco–we might’ve left our hearts there, too, but the bigger tragedy by far was the new-for-2007 BMW 3 Series 335i coupe we had to say goodbye to last week. After spending just a couple of days becoming familiar with the 335i twin turbo, we’re missing it more than any old internal organ. The 3 Series Bimmer is heralded world-’round as the benchmark of the entry-luxury class, and it’s clear why from the moment you step into one. The 2007 models have taken everything that made BMW’s reputation in this class what it is, and improved from there. The end result is a sight to behold, inside and out–and an awful hard automobile to walk away from.

Under the hood is where the biggest news sits. Pop the latch on the top-dog 335, and staring back out at you is a 3.0-liter inline six, based on the familiar mill from last year’s car. It’s an all-aluminum affair, with the VANOS variable valve timing. Sitting atop that familiar sight, though, is a pair of serious-looking Mitsubishi turbochargers-the likes of which haven’t been seen on any US-bound auto wearing the propeller badge in 25 years. The added aspiration adds up to 300 horsepower at 5800 rpm, and just about the flattest torque curve you ever saw, with all 300 lb.-ft. on tap from 1400 all the way up to 5000 rpm. The effect is like putting a finely-honed welterweight on steroids–all the smoothness and sublime response is still there, but with a new veneer or pure power as well. From a standing start, the 335i makes it to 60 mph in a scant 5.3 seconds (.2 seconds more for an automatic).

Read the full car review BMW 335

Written by Roadfly Charlie

Charlie is Roadfly’s founder and publisher, and was taught to drive by his father in a 1974 Porsche 914. That made poor Charlie a Porsche fanboy for life, and after driving a 911SC at 16, he bought and campaigned a variety of 944s at racetracks up and down the East Coast, earning awards and track records in his twenties. Charlie never really got over the car bug, and after a career in real estate development he founded the Internet media firm that became Roadfly. Charlie lives in McLean, VA with his wife and two daughters, and between the demands of family and business doesn’t have much time to play with cars anymore, excluding the machinery we review.

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