2011 Nissan Quest LE

If you know Nissan, you’ll know they have a reputation of building cars as smooth as their engines – engines that have won prestigious “engine of the year” awards in their categories. Apart from sensible family sedans, business saloons and hot sports cars, Nissan also have a rather excellent minivan – the 2011 Nissan Quest LE – top of the line trim, with seating for more people to enjoy all that it has to offer!

Exterior
The first thing you notice is that distinct chrome outlay just above the front grille. You would be excused for thinking it’s a saloon, and not a 200 inch long people carrier! It is beautiful, and no less practical right from the start, with automatic xenon headlamps, power sliding doors – not the power slides like other Nissan cars mind you, roof rails, 18 inch alloy wheels and even a moon roof, which is part of an optional package.

Interior
The equipment list on the 2011 Nissan Quest LE stretches even more on the inside, in tune with the three rows of seats. There’s an 8-way power driver’s seat, flat folding second row captain seats, and a 60:40 split-folding third row. You have tri-zone automatic climate control, a 120V AC power outlet, mood lighting, an in-cabin air microfilter, Bluetooth connectivity with streaming audio, a hard drive Navigation system and HomeLink transceiver as standard. Also standard is the fantastic Bose audio system with 13 speakers, DVD entertainment system complete with wireless headphones and a 7″ in-dash monitor.

Safety
The 2011 Nissan Quest LE, being the top-of-the-line variant spares no frills offering the full complement of safety features. Nissan’s advanced airbag system features dual-stage front airbags with seat-belt sensors, side airbags for all three rows, and front seats with active head rests and pre-tensioner and load limiter equipped seat belts. Traction Control and Vehicle Dynamic Control are also present, as are four-wheel vented disc brakes with Anti-lock Braking System and Electronic Brakeforce Distribution. The power steering is speed-sensitive as well. The LE is also equipped as standard with the Blind Spot Warning system, which is very useful if you’re looking to do some highway miles.

Performance
Handling propulsion duty is a smooth 3.5L V6 – one of Nissan’s finest engines. With 260 horsepower and 240 lb/ft of torque, it has ample push to make this Quest quite potent. It features Nissan’s CVTCS and is fitted as standard with iridium spark plugs. With independent suspension front and rear, featuring front stabilizer bars for added good measure, a light electronic power steering system and with the electronic aids, handling this big Quest is a breeze.

Overall, the 2011 Nissan Quest LE checks all the right boxes. It’s comfortable, practical, spacious, safe, frugal yet has good power on tap, and more importantly, it’s fun and reliable at the same time.

Overview – 2011 Nissan Quest LE
Model: Nissan Quest
Trim: LE
Price: From $41,350
Body Style: Minivan
Engine: 3.5L V6 24V DOHC with Continuously Variable Valve Timing Control System
Power: 260 hp / 6000 rpm
Torque: 240 lb/ft / 4400 rpm
Transmission: Xtronix CVT (Continuously Variable Transmission) Front Wheel Drive
Curb Weight: 4,568 lbs.
Wheels & Tires: 18 x 7.0 aluminum alloy with 235/55 TR18 all-season tires
Vehicle Warranty: 3 year / 36,000 miles limited coverage
Powertrain Warranty: 5 year / 60,000 miles limited coverage
Fuel economy EPA MPG: 19 city / 24 highway

Written by Roadfly Charlie

Charlie is Roadfly’s founder and publisher, and was taught to drive by his father in a 1974 Porsche 914. That made poor Charlie a Porsche fanboy for life, and after driving a 911SC at 16, he bought and campaigned a variety of 944s at racetracks up and down the East Coast, earning awards and track records in his twenties. Charlie never really got over the car bug, and after a career in real estate development he founded the Internet media firm that became Roadfly. Charlie lives in McLean, VA with his wife and two daughters, and between the demands of family and business doesn’t have much time to play with cars anymore, excluding the machinery we review.

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